Why Do People Breakup?

why do people break up?Relationships are the assembly of individual identities. They’re about support, equality, balance and most importantly, acceptance. – vancitylifecoach.com/about. Preserving these types of values keep relationships alive, and help us rise above a lot of relationship challenges. However, if these core values are neglected, communication starts to breakdown, intimacy begins to dwindle and we’ll no longer feel understood by each other. Which then establishes the foundation for every disagreement and difficulty that soon proceed. Indeed, it’s drifting away from core relationship values which carry us into ‘breakup’ territory.

We’re all conscious beings full of complicated emotions, and we’re driven by what we desire from life. When two of us decide to align our lives together, we do so because we’re enthralled by each other’s identities. As we explore each other’s physical and metaphysical worlds, an intimate bond develops, and makes it easy for our emotions to intensify, and for our personal desires to get blurred. In these moments, we become very present and nothing else matters but the here and now. We want nothing but to hold onto these feelings for a lifetime; we want nothing to change because of how we feel within ourselves.

We all want to be completely understood and want to be accepted and embraced for who we are, and it’s never more realized than in newer relationships. When we meet people who make us feel this way, it’s easy to develop an attachment towards them. It’s about how we feel. We long for these traits because they help us believe in ourselves and help affirm our identities, and this is how we need to feel in order to fulfil our own desires. Being truly understood, accepted and embraced, these are the innate, underlying intentions we all share when pursuing a relationship, because they allow us to love ourselves. If we’re not feeling any these fundamental emotions within, love, generally, cannot grow and the relationship will struggle to fulfil its purpose. Instead, we can find ourselves holding onto an attachment that lacks substance, and that’s when the doubts and uncertainties start to arise.

We tend to forget, or pay very little attention to, our own contributions during the growth stages in relationships. In the beginning, everything is new and exciting, the future is brighter, we’re feeling good and if, by, some sort of sorcery, we manage to become just as valuable to our partners as they are to us, but it’s easy to lose sight of that for a number of reasons…

We become so mesmerized by the other person in the beginning, that we’re not mindful of the conscious exchange that’s at play. If the balance of the exchange is not maintained, and the scales tip in favour towards one person or the other – i.e. we receive more love, appreciation, understanding and acceptance e.t.c., than we give, or, give more than we receive, or, don’t give each other any at all – a pressure or burden begins to amount and that’s when we start drifting apart.

…for one, we live in a world abundant with messages that reinforce a certain ideology of love, and we get so caught up in these ideas and ideals, that our natural intentions get skewed. It’s a wicked conditioning that uses our motivations against us. We’re bombarded with associations of what love and belonging looks like, sounds like, tastes like and what it’s like to touch and smell love. These imitations reinforce a belief that love is limited to our 5 physical senses and as a result, we start moulding ourselves to appeal to these senses. It’s a reason why ‘profile dating’ even exists, and why it’s difficult to develop the courage to strike up a conversation and get to know somebody. It’s a reason why inequality is still a struggle today, because we’ve been taught to believe that love is not blind, that love is biased and that true, genuine and honest emotion can quite possibly be bought.

Political, social and economic conspiracies aside, we shouldn’t be entering relationships being understood, accepted and embraced, for qualities that do not represent who we are. Qualities that do not represent the conscious being within (our trues heart’s desire). Otherwise, we’ll find it difficult to sustain any emotional connection with anyone, because the core relationship values would’ve been built upon a fallacy. I think all of us can agree that no matter how hard we try, the truth of what we’re feeling will always find a way to surface. The weight of that truth will continue to get heavier and more unavoidable over time, and places a strain on our relationships.

If truth cannot reside within a relationship, how much longer an individual go on feeling misunderstood? How much longer can two people live with misaligned desires? How much longer can an individual live complacently?

However, there are still many of us who have managed to escape the influences of the world and have established and maintained very honest relationships. Breakups that do occur in these sort of bonds are the result of mutual understanding. If we’re constantly being honest about how we feel, and we completely unveil our truths as soon as they surface, then issues are given the opportunity to be resolved. We can avoid a lot of prolonged upset and heartache, if we preserve an environment where we can open up and communicate. After all, a lot of arguments and frustrations are the manifestations of unresolved problems.

In summary, relationships should empower us to explore life fully, so that we can each discover and/or fulfill our individual purpose. When we form a relationship, we enter a mutual agreement based on this very philosophy. We don’t enter them to feel restricted or suppressed, nor do we want that for our partners.  Therefore, if any of us are ever feeling this way in our relationships, we have duty to ourselves and to each other to open up about how we feel, and work towards a resolution so that we can each continue to progress our lives forward.

Vancouver Life Coach

Relationships: The Importance of Unveiling Your Past

Separated Yin Yang

Your life up until this point; the identity you live with today, is a collection of your experiences, everything you have learned and traits that you may have inherited. Part of being in a relationship is sharing your life with another, therefore it’s important to share your past with your partner.

For one, knowing that you’ve truly bared all is extremely liberating. Knowing that you have nothing to hide makes for an uncomplicated relationship that’s not only built on trust, but built on honesty too.

These two values are crucial, if you desire the components that make up a powerful partnership that carries on throughout the rest of your life.

Furthermore, knowing that there’s nothing left to uncover, allows you to be easily understood.

When I coach couples, I ask very tough questions in order to expose an honesty that someone perhaps lives with, but has not yet shared. I ask difficult questions because it indicates how well a couple communicate and how well people actually understand each other.

When you share your past with your significant other, you’re sharing information that is essential towards keeping your relationship alive. First of all, your partner won’t be spending their lifetime trying to figure you out, that alone can cause complications and insecurities.

Your past reveals your motivations and it reveals your emotional triggers, so just think about how this information can elevate bliss and happiness within your relationship. Teach your partner about the person you are, educate them on your past so that together you can have a mindful future.

The beautiful thing about letting your past out, is that you let it go. If there is a part of you that you haven’t shared with your significant other, then already you’ve begun to diminish core values. And if there are problems at the very core, the effect is felt at the surface (i.e. you’ll find yourself disagreeing and placing significance over smaller, less important issues, more frequently).

Revealing your past also allows you to remain present.

People always argue that if you reveal too much you leave nothing left to uncover, that there’s an excitement to the mystery. I agree, and that’s great at the very beginning of a relationship…a lot of the excitement when starting something new, comes from discovering new things. However, as you begin to understand each other and connect, excitement generates from exploring life as you move your relationship forward. From the mystery of exploring each other’s potential and embarking on parallel journeys towards self-actualization.

You may fear judgment and loss as a result of the information you share, but the whole point of sharing your life with someone, is that you have someone that accepts your identity completely and vice versa.

Society put’s on a lot of pressure and expects you to live up to certain ideologies: to get married at a certain age, start a family, fill a home with memories and beautiful things that elevate their image of perfection and bliss. This motivation is corrosive to your identity and this pressure may force you down avenues you’re not ready for.

A relationship is about the elevation of spirit; to experience nirvana and to engage you in fulfilling your purpose. You won’t get that until you give yourself completely. All the other things that you progress into (i.e. the home, the family etc.) merely become extensions of a growing relationship, not the definition of one.

Lastly and most importantly, sharing your past allows you to communicate confidently. It lessens the impact of misinterpretation and allows you to remain honest and maintain trust.

Vancouver Relationship and Life Coach

Are Your Motivations Man-made?

Thinker

Have you ever wondered how much of your life is man-made? Ever considered how much of your life is driven by man-made philosophies that guide your choices, mould your identity and overrun your emotions and natural desires?

Take the institution of marriage for example, it’s not necessarily an innate desire, we’re taught to long for this lawful union. Religion too, people submit lives, generations even, towards words written by man. Our careers maybe, are they driven by our thirst for power and purpose or do we slave away for the sake of climbing a social ladder?

I was on a date a few weeks ago and the girl I met was nice enough, she was pretty, very intelligent and I would say she was text-book perfect. Problem was, I found her very reserved, afraid to open up and let out what she truly wanted from life. It seemed she was conditioned to believe marriage was one of life’s natural wonders, so when I posed the question, “What if the entire concept of marriage didn’t exist, what would be your drive for companionship?” She stared at me with the blankest expression as if her mind had been formatted, I felt like I had insulted her.

It got me thinking about how many people in my life have very similar views, I don’t think a week goes by where a family member or a friend asks me about my marital status or how many digits occupy my bank account. Is it not enough to just accept that I’m happy, healthy and human, surrounded by a truck load of love and that I now live with a mountain sized passion for life? It’s like many cannot accept that I could arrive at this level of fulfillment without having followed certain ideologies.

Is it that difficult to comprehend, that we can drive ourselves simply by the honesty we carry in our emotions? That life is actually a lot simpler outside the flow of man-made principles.

I’m beginning to wonder if humanity has lost touch with the very things that make us human. How is anyone supposed to reach self-actualization and fulfilment, if we’re so conditioned to live life dictated by man-made values, popular movements and lean our desires towards marketable trends?

OK, maybe I’m heading off on a frustrated tangent here, but think about it, when was the last time you did something unstructured and genuinely honest? How much of your life is innately motivated?

Give yourself the opportunity to ponder this thought and tap into your true intent, before making your next life decision.

Vancouver Relationship and Life Coach

Relationships: What Makes A Powerful Partnership?

by, VanCityLifeCoach.com

Relationships

We construct our goals and our life missions based on the very traits of our own identity. We seek the things we like and love, and work towards eliminating anything negative. We propel our lives forward by desire and in search of fulfillment, so why settle for anything less in relationships?

There’s a list of things in my life that I rarely like to talk about, relationships feature prominently on that list. For those who know me personally, know that I’m very focused on what I want from life, but when it comes to relationships I find myself always changing my mind.

I don’t know why and maybe it’s just me, but the intimacy and connection one can create with another is difficult to put into words. It’s an experience to live rather than a discussion to have; each relationship is as individual as the people who make them.

Hand on heart, I consider myself lucky to have experienced this phenomena first hand, even though it was short lived, it left a lasting impression on my life. It changed my entire point of view on what it means to be connected to another person.

You see, it was never about how she smiled or how she did her hair that mattered. It was the impact she had on my aspirations that opened my eyes to what it meant to have a powerful partner. Furthermore it was the impact I had on her aspirations, where I understood the importance of companionship and its role in life.

Your identity has its strengths and its weaknesses, knowing these traits help you succeed in every aspect of your life and therefore very important to understand when getting into a relationship. You must find and be a partner that contributes to self-assurance.

Where I was angry she was calm, where she suffered doubt I offered confidence, where I lacked patience she had time. To put it simply, where one was weak the other was strong and it was always about balancing out the weaker components of each other’s identity that made the bond strong.

Being in a relationship does have a bigger purpose to serve and the strength of your identity will establish what you have to gain and what you have to offer.

A powerful partnership goes beyond your interests and hobbies, far from the music you like and what you share in common. As far as I’ve experienced, they’re just conveniences that fill moments in living everyday life. Take all that away and what are you truly left with? What purpose does the relationship serve?

Don’t allow yourself to be influenced by individuals desperate to find each other, but have yet to find themselves. Continue to learn more about yourself and grow to know what it is you have to gain from a relationship, and how a relationship will guide you closer towards a life of fulfillment.

Vancouver Relationship and Life Coach

The Secret to Long Lasting Relationships

I’ve been asked countless times about offering good, solid relationship advice; the truth is – there really isn’t any. Not unless it’s focused on a specific situation, because relationships are odd and complex. I have asked an assortment of happy couples the secret to longevity and maintaining a healthy relationship – usually the first thing they do is look at each other before they respond. How you interpret that is up to you, however I feel it is a very telling sentiment and if there was any secret, then it perhaps lies in the simplicity of the look before the response – I interpreted this as safety.

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Remember when we were young; I’m talking about that naive, shy and innocent version of us.  Remember that childlike quality we’ve tried so hard to shed; when liking someone didn’t really make sense and feelings were raw and uninterrupted? Sort of like the first interaction we had with our partner, that excitement and attraction that blossomed into a relationship. I reckon it’s this childlike quality that we need to maintain; the vulnerability.

When facing dilemmas and during moments of strife, we should strip the focus back to those basics, the entire reason that brought two individuals together; the reasons why it works. I get that this approach to relationships is blurred by pressures that may or may not have existed when it all started, but do think back to moments of bliss. The simplicity of the relationship at the very beginning is what tends to surface during the happiest moments. It’s a connection between vulnerability and safety. What was it about the other half that allowed us to feel safe enough to be vulnerable to begin with? It’s very important to understand.

Also, how often do we reminisce? How often do we step back from difficulties and remember the easy stuff to set things back into motion? When faced with relationship dilemmas we often overlook the roots and sometimes allow ourselves to be controlled by outside forces. We end up emotionally closing ourselves off, build a defense and guard ourselves from the very person we opened up to. That’s when the ‘trust’ begins to diminish, when the ‘changes’ seem more evident and the ‘struggles’ set in – because we’re not allowing ourselves to be vulnerable.

Being vulnerable causes us to be completely honest and to be read very easily. We have to grow up in so many ways already. As adults, we have to let the lessons we’ve learned guide us to avoid vulnerable situations. The best thing, I think, about being in a relationship is to feel safe enough to do the exact opposite; after all it’s how it all started in the first place.

“I trust her”, “she has always been there for me”, “we don’t go to bed angry” and “We give each other space”. Whatever the response I received, you could always tell that they got the fundamentals right, allowing each other to be vulnerable and safe, keeping the newness of the relationship alive and continue to discover and understand the person that they’re with.

Vancouver Relationship and Life Coach